Unit 8 – New Note “do”

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Unit 8.1 – Unit 8 Songs (p.37)

Purpose – Learn so-mi-do songs

  • Practising the so-mi-do and so-do motifs needed for Unit 8
  • Practise performing rests

Activities

Hob Shoe Hob and Pease Pudding Hot may make a better introduction to rests than those in Unit 7.1. However, due to the introduction of the new note “do” they have been left until Unit 8. One option is to use the songs to establish the sense of the rest aurally. Then return to complete the work on “do” after Unit 7 is completed.

Hob Shoe Hob This song is about a blacksmith hammering a horse-shoe onto a horse’s hoof. On the rest, hammer your fist onto your other hand. Any students struggling with the silent rest can shout “bang” in the rest. Eventually using their thinking voice for the bang. (Source: Jolly Music Handbook for Beginners by Cyrilla Rowsell and David Vinden)

Pease Pudding Hot Sing the song and create actions to fill the rest beats. You can start by including sounds with the actions and then remove the actions to create a silent rest; hot – mmm, cold – brrr, old – yuk. (Source: Jolly Music Handbook for Beginners by Cyrilla Rowsell and David Vinden)

Mouse Mousie This is a tricky song to perform. We need to warn the mouse that the kitten is coming, but if we sing too loudly then the kitten will hear us! Can we sing softly but not too softly?

Unit 8.2 – Hob Shoe Hob (p.38)

Purpose – Learn the new note “do

  • Learn the new note “do
    Practise performing rests
    Learn that an accent means suddenly louder and the symbol for an accent is >

Activities

Sing Hob Shoe Hob with the activities from Unit 8.1. Sing “that’s well shod” in a louder voice, you are hammering the last nails in.
Sing the first two lines of the song. Sign and sing the first two lines. They use “so” and “mi“. Sing the next line. There’s a new note lower than “so“. It’s called “do” and its hand sign is a fist at waist level.
Sign and sing so-mi-do echoes always passing through “mi“.
Show the student where “do” is found on the keyboard (for now, “do” would need to be an F#). We can slide up or down onto white keys as before. So there is a gap between “do” and “mi“. We use our left hand for “do“.

With the book

We can see from the first line that “so” and “mi” are line notes. Which note must be “do“?
When “so” is a line note, “mi” is the line note below and “do” is the line note below that. When “so” is a space note, “mi” is the space note below and “do” is the space note below that.
Using correct dynamics – clap and say the rhythm names, sign and sing the singing names.
For now, the position of “do” as a Bass F or Bass G will be too low for most young students to sing accurately. You need to explain that our voices can’t possibly sing all the notes on the keyboard so from now on we won’t always be able to sing aloud while we play. Instead we will sing in our thinking voices.
Notice the symbols below “that’s well shod”. They are accents and notes with accents should be played more firmly to make them louder. We need really good arm, wrist and hand technique for this. Use the weight of the arm.

Extension

Playing “do” as Middle C is possible and will enable the student to sing along. Some students can be shown this but identifying Middle C is covered in DoReMi Piano Book 2.

Unit 8.3 – Pease Pudding Hot (p.39)

Purpose – Learn the new note “do”

  • Practise the new note “do”
  • Practise performing rests
  • Remember the repeat marks mean to repeat from the beginning

Activities

Sing Pease Pudding Hot with the activities from Unit 8.1
Sing the first two lines of the song. Sign and sing the first two lines. Sing the next line and notice the new low note “do“.
Sign and sing so-mi-do echoes always passing through “mi“.
Remind the student where “do” is found on the keyboard and that there is a gap between “do” and “mi“.

With the book

We can see from the first line that “so” and “mi” are space notes. Which note must be “do“?
When “so” is a line note, “mi” is the line note below and “do” is the line note below that. When “so” is a space note, “mi” is the space note below and “do” is the space note below that.
Using correct dynamics – clap and say the rhythm names, sign and sing the singing names. Remember to repeat the song from the beginning. Sing the song with the lyrics and follow the music, can you see that on the repeat we sing the second set of lyrics.
Sing in our thinking voices while playing the song on the black keys, then the white keys.

Unit 8.4 – Mouse Mousie (p.40)

Purpose – Learn the new note “do”

  • Practise the new note “do”
  • Practise so-mi-do and so-do motifs
  • The special musical term (Italian term) for moderately soft is mezzo-piano mf in music instructs the performer to play or sing moderately softly
  • Understand we can use ledger lines if we need more lines

Preparation Activities

Sign and sing so-mi-do echoes including so-do and do-so intervals

Activities

Sing Mouse Mousie with the activities from Unit 8.1
On a piece of paper or whiteboard, write all the dynamic markings we have learnt. Which one would be appropriate for this song? Mezzo-forte is still a bit loud. Do you think we could have mezzo-piano? Explain that mezzo-piano means moderately soft and is between piano and mezzo-forte.

With the book

We can see from the first line that “so” and “mi” are line notes, but they are right at the bottom of the stave. We haven’t got another line for “do“. So we give “do” it’s very own mini line called a ledger line.
Using correct dynamics – clap and say the rhythm names, sign and sing the singing names.
Sing in our thinking voices while playing the song on the black keys, then the white keys.

Unit 8.5 – Five a Day (p.41)

Purpose – Sight Reading

  • Read unknown melodies from the score

With the book

For each melody the student must complete the standard homework sequence with the correct dynamics and articulation (accents). Remind the student what the repeat marks mean. This unit can be carried over a number of weeks.

Homework

Complete the standard homework for each of these melodies every day (or every practice!)

Preparing for Book 2

This can be done during the last lessons of Book 1 depending on the student.

Using White Keys Ensure that the student is happy playing their pieces on white keys. Show them how to slide down from the black keys. They may need help sliding each pitch the same way. Notice the patterns. There is a spare white key between “so” and “mi” and between “mi” and “do”.

Using One Hand Ask the student to try and play their favourite so-mi songs with one hand. Make sure they understand that we need relaxed hands so must not use adjacent fingers across a gap.

Musical Alphabet Ask the student if they know their alphabet, they will probably recite it to you, or even sing it. Explain that in music we name the white keys on the keyboard after the letters of the alphabet. You might have a conversation about how many white keys there are. Certainly more than 26! Explain that we only use the first seven letters but they repeat over and over. You can make this sound exciting and easy, only 7 instead of 26! Sometimes I pretend to be sad. My name is Helen and the alphabet doesn’t go as far as H. Depending on the student’s name you can be sad together or happy that their name is included! Show them that on a full-size keyboard we start at the bottom with A and count up the keys as you play, reciting the seven letters. Show them an F and challenge them to find all the Fs.

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